on breaking the mould

Saturday 29 May 2010

this is a papier maché decorative bowl – one of a series that i made as a supporting sideline to my artistic practice soon after graduation from art school.


[papier maché bowl, c.1993]

my papier maché objects were influenced by things I saw in books, artefacts in local museums, and stories of Anglo-Saxon hoards such as Sutton Hoo… it seemed much more straightforward to develop, promote and market one’s work in those days, with none of the ‘issues’ associated with art on the internet…

i am revisiting some ideas and ways of working in 3d again, but differently… i do have, at least, a personal history to draw from….


[plaster cast moulds]

here are some other experimental things in the working – inkjet transfers and monoprints, from my lichen photographs…


[lichen photographic image transfers]

i like the subtle degradation of the images here, more authentic and textural than a glossy photograph…


[image transfer]

which links back to the previous blog post on using digital images in artmaking.


[lichen on stonework – digital photograph]

my digitally dissolved ‘blind’ landscape photographs also created some interesting effects as image transfers – resulting in quite delicately textured works on paper…


[inkjet monoprint transfer]

strangely, what was once just a traditional landscape image of East Anglia has now evolved into what looks like mould spores on a damp wall… i am trying out some different substrates…

I spent my amazon gift voucher on Richter’s ‘Cage’ paintings book, having picked it up and put it down on two occasions at the Tate Modern. Storr’s accompanying text is rich in description and poetic metaphor, putting into words the action of painting, but much of this text is aimed at the non-artist. Gerhard Richter‘s own words on the ‘Cage’ series are curiously absent, but this is more than made up in the many and generous photographic details of painting processes and surface textures…